How I Avoid Impulse Shopping

Typically, I do not shop in groups or in high-stress situations, like sample or archival sales, but when I do, the temptation kicks in. I’m not alone, either–impulse purchases are not rare. My colleague, Vogue Runway’s Fashion News Writer José Criales-Unzetta, recently purchased a pajama set from the Marni x Uniqlo collaboration sale that he was element of. “Everything was selling out, so I was like, ‘I must have it instead of other people,’ ” he says. “To be fair, I have already worn everything else from the collab I got.”

According to the Harvard Business Review, in a stressful situation—like a possibly once-in-a-lifetime archival sale—our brains react differently, forcing us to make reactionary decisions instead of thoughtful, rational ones. I was worried about missing out on a piece of that sought-after archival pie, even if it came in the form of something I didn’t necessarily want. It was

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Twitter is testing shopping reminders for upcoming product drops

Twitter is testing a new shopping feature for previewing upcoming product releases. The feature, called Product Drops, allows brands to tease items before they go on sale, and customers can sign up to be reminded prior to the release through in-app notifications.

The company shared how reminders would work in a blog post today. When brands set up product drops, shoppers can sign up for alerts by clicking a “remind me” button. Product drop tweets act like other posts on Twitter and can be liked, retweeted, bookmarked, and shared. Users who opt in to get reminders will get a notification 15 minutes before the time of the release and at the set time of the drop. When it’s time to purchase and users click the notification, they’ll be directed to a “shop on website” button leading to the brand’s site.

Image: Twitter

The test is currently limited to iOS users

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Adobe CEO says e-commerce is seeing price decreases, expects strong future for online shopping

Several categories of e-commerce are seeing price decreases and support the expectation that digital shopping among consumers will hold strong, Adobe chief executive Shantanu Narayen told CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Thursday.

“When you look at the total expense, in addition to the macroeconomic, where there may be a little bit more concern, what’s happening is actually you’re seeing some price decreases in elements like electronics or things that are happening with games,” Narayen said in an interview on “Mad Money.”

Grocery inflation is still high, he added.

The CEO’s comments come a day before the May consumer price index, which measures data mostly from non-online outlets, is set to come out. Wall Street nervously looked forward to the data on Thursday as a measure of the state of inflation, with stocks declining for the day.

Narayen also noted that consumer spending increased by $1 billion from April to May, according

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